Adverse


Adverse Definition of Adverse by Merriam-Webster

4.19.2018 by Trinity Alsopp
Adverse
Adverse Definition of Adverse by Merriam-Webster

Adverse definition is - acting against or in a contrary direction : hostile. How to use adverse in a sentence. adverse vs. averse.

Spanish Central: Translation of adverse.

More from Merriam-Webster on adverse.

How a folk song became a term of derision.

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mistrial Manafort Guilty on 8 Counts.

Send us feedback. These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adverse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors.

Other words from adverse adverse.

b : causing harm : harmful adverse drug effects.

: bad or unfavorable : not good.

That dessert might kill you.

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Adverse Definition of adverse in English by Oxford Dictionaries

11.26.2018 by Ashley Jeff
Adverse
Adverse Definition of adverse in English by Oxford Dictionaries

Adverse means 'unfavourable or harmful' and is normally used of conditions and effects rather than people, as in adverse weather conditions. Averse, on the other hand, is used of people, nearly always with to, and means 'having a strong dislike or opposition to something', as in I am not averse to helping out.

Preventing success or development; harmful; unfavourable.

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Find Out More Follow. Archaic words have a charm that never fades away, from French sounding to wondrously mysterious ones.

Adverse means ‘unfavourable or harmful’ and is normally used of conditions and effects rather than people, as in adverse weather conditions.

Adverse Synonyms, Adverse Antonyms

10.25.2018 by Emma Anderson
Adverse

Synonyms for adverse at with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and definitions. Find descriptive alternatives for adverse.

Nor was it a small inducement to him to think that the side he adopted was adverse to Kate.

gent avers "infidel race"), from Latin adversus "turned against, turned toward, fronting, facing," figuratively "hostile, adverse, unfavorable," past participle of advertere, from ad- "to" (see ad- ) + vertere "to turn" (see versus ). Related: Adversely. late 14c., "contrary, opposing," from Old French avers (13c., Modern French adverse ) "antagonistic, unfriendly, contrary, foreign" (e.g.

Yet it is difficult to understand the grounds of these adverse criticisms.

There was some adverse criticism of the play as a whole, but there was only one opinion of Haxard.

The experience of civilized nations has hitherto been adverse to Socialism.

"Some adverse influence is at work," said Funkelstein, with some vexation.

Miller's 'suggestion' is adverse to the serenity of the psychic, that's all.

She anticipated for me the cold winds and beating rains of an adverse destiny.

The adverse weather held us in front and the disease pressed on our rear.

It is not wonderful that property began in adverse possession.

Criticisms when they have been adverse have been surprisingly harsh.

Adverse

9.24.2018 by Ashley Jeff
Adverse

Adverse most often refers to things, denoting something that is in opposition to someone's interests — something one might refer to as an adversity or adversary — (adverse winds; an attitude adverse to our ideals).

See also versus. First attested around 1374, from Old French avers (French adverse ), from Latin adversus ( “ turned against ” ), past participle of advertere, from ad- ( “ to ” ) + vertere ( “ to turn ” ).

adverse ( plural adverses ) adverse adverse.

From Latin adversus ( “ against, opposite ” ).

adverse ( comparative adverser, superlative adversest ).

Averse usually refers to people, and implies one has a distaste, disinclination, or aversion toward something ( a leader averse to war ; an investor averse to risk taking ). Adverse most often refers to things, denoting something that is in opposition to someone's interests — something one might refer to as an adversity or adversary — ( adverse winds ; an attitude adverse to our ideals ). Adverse shows up less often in this type of construction, describing a person instead of a thing, and should carry a meaning of "actively opposed to" rather than "has an aversion to". Averse is most often used with " to " in a construction like " I am averse to… ". Adverse is sometimes confused with averse, though the meanings are somewhat different.

Adverse vs. averse Choose Your Words

7.22.2018 by Evan Mason
Adverse

Choose Your Words - Adverse and averse are both turn-offs, but adverse is something harmful, and averse is a strong feeling of dislike. Rainstorms can cause.

Averse is usually applied to feelings, attitudes, or people. Averse also goes with risk to describe people (or banks) who don't like taking them:. It's a strong feeling of opposition — it's a big "no thanks" and it's often followed by to.

( Scientific American ). The pact was intended to limit the adverse effects of climate change but only obliged developed countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Adverse and averse are both turn-offs, but adverse is something harmful, and averse is a strong feeling of dislike. Rainstorms can cause adverse conditions, and many people are averse to rain.

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It's often followed by the word effects :. Adverse describes something that works against you, like a tornado or a computer crash, and is usually applied to things.

( New York Times ). Nevertheless, Ms. Fishbein is not averse to a large sociable gathering.

Continue reading. To be averse to something is to be opposed to it on moral, philosophical or aesthetic grounds: my father is averse to people smoking cigarettes in the house, but he would not be averse to your smoking a cigar.

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Your survey shows that banks are more risk- averse than they used to be. ( Business Week ).

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More significantly, he has shown that if such ageing cells are selectively destroyed, these adverse effects go away. ( Economist ).

( Seattle Times ). Balth isn't averse to including human beings in his work.

If it's a force of nature working against you, use adverse. Kick out the "d" and a person can be averseto or againstanything, like rainy days or gambling.

If it's adverse, it's working against you — like adverse weather conditions or the adverse effects of eating too much sugar. Steer clear of anything adverse. Continue reading.